Unlocking Nature's GreenTech Potential

Water . Agriculture . Soil . Trees . Energy


The One World Waste Project  

 a not for profit company created for social change 

 in alignment with the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Developement Agenda

Integrating crop & energy systems provides the opportunity to amplify production & diversify product slate, through the correct utilization of available organic waste.

 The 'waste' is feedstock for the bio-processes, delivering an agroecological best practice & an onsite sustainability that is well adapted to climate change & is carbon negative.

 Agroecological, Zero Waste Systems are designed to function on various scales & configurations, from household to industrial applications.


What is Agroecology?

  • The adaption of ecological processes applied to agricultural systems, increasing yields while reducing environmental impacts.
  • A scientific practice and a social movement.
  • Sustainable regenerative farming systems that improve the well being of small-scale & emerging farmers.
  • A cycle of natural processes within the 5 Kingdoms of Nature - Bacteria, Algae, Fungi, Plants & Animals - where the waste of one process becomes feed stock for the following process, resulting in a climate resilient, environmentally friendly agriculture.
  • A knowledge intensive system, developed by the farmer, through understanding local conditions, to produce nutrients and energy on the farm, rather than relying on external inputs.

Integrated Crop & Energy Systems are scalable and replicable and adapted to site specifications.


Micro Scale


SCHOOLS - The Agroecological Classroom & Greentech Hub provides ample opportunities for learners to engage with Nature in practical ways, across all subjects, grades & curriculum - the Sciences, Technology, Business Management, Environmental Management, Health & Nutrition, Life Orientation.

The Agroecological Classroom - Planting Lesson, Mossesani Baloyi School, Northern Province, South Africa 


FEEDSTOCK FOR BIOSYSTEMS

  • household kitchen waste and food waste from supermarkets/restaurants/hotels. 
  • garden refuse and municipal roadside maintainance biomass.
  • animal manure.
  • organic waste from abbattoires, dairies, chicken farms  
  • crop waste.
  • Crops grown specifically for digester fodder - to supplement available organic waste streams, eg: sugar beet, algal biomass, moringa, hemp
  • sewage sludge. 

''Diverting just a portion of the world's food waste to Waste-to-Energy systems could free up large amounts of landfill space while powering vehicles and heating homes, thus putting a significant dent in our collective carbon footprint" SCIENTIFIC AMERICA


Small Scale


COMMUNITIES & COOPERATIVES - For the purposes of equitable  development that provides food & energy production, waste management strategies & employment opportunities. 

Ntinga Ndoda, Keiskammahoek, Community Centre, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Agricultural Digester & Mix Crop Production - Finishes of Nature.


Medium Scale

At medium scale, these provide localised solutions to energy shortages.

Typical projects include biogas plants where the energy - electricity/heat/gas is used for own use, or wheeled through the existing grid to nearby private buyers.

AGROPROCESSING SITES - Waste to Energy & Food. Adjusted for industrial operations but involving & benefiting small-scale farmers.

Organic waste processing facilities offer the potential to produce primarily, soil; biogas and biofertiliser. Examples of secondary processes would be food production in aquatic or terrestrial farming systems. These activities add significant value to revenue streams supporting quicker returns on the initial capital investment of the site. It is very advantageous to upgrade organic waste processing sites, from compost production, and rather, to deliver the full spectrum of the potential product slate.


Realising Waste's Potential

  • Integrating crop & energy systems aligns with the National Environmental Management Waste ACT (RSA, 2009). This identifies the Waste Sector as key to providing employment opportunities that can contribute towards local economic growth.
  • The National Green Economy Accord (EDD, 2011) recognizes the role the Waste Sector , specifically re-use, recycling & recovery can play in South Africa's transition to a Green Economy.

One of the challenges for the Waste to Food and/or Energy sector, is to source and maintain a consistent, and suitable supply of organic waste streams for biogas production and vermiculture. In addition, the correct ratio of feedstocks to extract maximum methane potential,and ph correct soil production.

Therefor these systems are well placed at municipal waste processing sites, agro processing facilities, centralised agricultural co-ops,  abattoirs, chicken farms and dairies because of the abundant supply of readily available organic waste. The anaerobic digestion of waste, reduces its volume by 87%  but also harnesses its embedded energy, putting it to good use. Waste-to-Energy is one of the most robust and effective alternative energy options to reduce CO2 emissions and replace the burning of fossil fuels.


Central to waste-to-energy & food-Systems is the anaerobic digestion of organic wastes through Biogas Digesters. Which make use of micro-organisms to break down and convert organic waste into biogas, a technology that is  over 3 thousand years old & already benefits the lives of many in the developing world. Small, medium & large scale biogas digester plants contribute to sustainable development by providing many socioeconomic, environmental, industrial & agricultural benefits. 

Integrated Biogas Digester & Algal Pond Technology

Top Shop , Morgan Bay , Finishes of Nature

  • Diversification of energy.
  • Enhanced regional & rural development opportunities.
  • Creation of domestic industry & employment opportunities.
  • Reduction of local pollutants.
  • Reduced deforestation & therefore increased biodiversity.
  • Increased sequestration of carbon in soils by adding the digested organic waste.
  • Carbon Sequestration.
  • Improved water quality through reduced run off from waste materials.
  • Increased Food production by the application to the soil of digested organic materials supplying readily available nutrients, improving soil structure & water holding capacity.
  • Mitigates air pollution
  • Mitigates Climate Change.

INTEGRATING BIOGAS AND ALGALCULTURE

Algae are simple photosynthetic, generally water-based organisms, that produce oxygen, using energy from sunlight during photosynthesis to sequester carbon dioxide (C02) from the atmosphere into biomass. 

Algae merges bio-systems, amplifies production and sucks up our carbon overload.

THE ADDITION OF ALGAL POND TECHNOLOGY TO TREAT & OXIDISE THE WASTE EFFLUENT FROM THE DIGESTERS, PRODUCES A POWERFUL, NUTRIENT RICH LIQUID FERTILISER. THIS CAN BE DRIED AND USED AS ANIMAL FEED OR FISH FEED. AS A WASTE WATER TREATMENT, ALGAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS WILL EFFECTIVELY ELIMINATE E.COLI & PATHOGENIC BACTERIA & VIRUSES.

Climate adaption and climate resilience is crucial to the future of  energy & food production globally.  

 Algae uses Carbon dioxide to release oxygen. 

Through the process of photosynthesis algae plays an important role in maintaining the proper concentrations of carbon dioxide and oxygen within our environment. We cannot replace the Earth's trees fast enough to address the current rate of global warming. We can, however, grow algae, rapidly. Interestingly Algae requires increased levels of CO2 for high productivity -  and high productivity means increased absorbtion of CO2 

"Soon after the arrival of algae on this planet, oxygen began to exist in the atmosphere. The early atmosphere was mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour. Water vapour condensed to form the oceans. Photosynthesis from Algae and primitive plants caused the amount of carbon dioxide to decrease, and oxygen to increase." -Chemistry of the Atmosphere-

  • ALGAE CAN BE GROWN ANYWHERE AND YIELDS UP TO 30 TIMES THE BIOMASS THAN ANY OTHER CROP!
  • Through the processing of waste streams, for example- waste water treatment works, or biodigester effluent, it provides a biomass that is rich in nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium & plant growth hormones.
  • Microalgae can be used as a tertiary bio-treatment for wastewater works, therefor an improved water security as a result of processes.
  • Coupled with the production of valuable biomass that has a broad range of purposes. It can be used as an effective fertilizer, animal feed & feed stock for fish farming, aquaponic systems or biogas digestion.
  • One kilogram of algae will produce sufficient methane to generate approximately 1 kwh of electricity.

It is possible to extract some valuable byproducts from the algal biomass, including fatty acids, amino acids, plant hormones, pigments, oils for biodiesal, nutriceuticals, metabolites & B-carotene. The extraction processes for these by-products incorporate the same cryogenic compressors that are used to purify methane when extracting the co2 content from the biogas, referred to as scrubbing or upgrading the biogas  to produce methane for electricity generation. 

Algae, used for food and nutriceuticals for thousands of years, and the large scale cultivation of algae, for over half a century. Algalculture merges traditional agriculture and aquaculture.

 It is crucial that policy frameworks support the development of the algal biomass industry, as a source of renewable fuels, biofertiliser, high value protein, carbohydrates and nutriceuticals.



Soil Production - Vermiculture

Strong emphasis is placed on agricultural, industrial, municipal & organic waste management, assisting with odour control, pathogen reduction, nutrient beneficiation, volume reduction, energy, fertilizer, soil & crop production. 

Raised Bed Preparation. In the background are Waste 2 Food industrial scale earthworm hammocks for vermiculture and ultimately crop production. 

MIXED CROP PLANTING PRACTICES - for encouraging microrhizal fungi - the internet for plants.

Preparing soil mixes for greenhouse growbeds. 


Earthworm Hammocks -vermiculture - for soil production. Waste to Food - Closing the Loop, Phillipi, Cape Town.


Climate Smart Crop Production

Utilizing climate-control, shade net or winter-cover poly-tunnels with drip irrigation, significantly increases yields, helps maintain consistent soil moisture levels & extends seasonal harvest periods.

Superior quality soil mix, a byproduct of waste processes, is used in the raised growing beds, resulting in high yielding, nutrient dense crops. 

Crop waste is fed back to the Digester. 

Space optimization can be achieved through planting the sides of growing beds or using vertical farming techniques & integrating farming methods such as combining hydroponics & fish farming - aquaculture.

Organisms such as humic acid, built up from good composting methods and nutrient beneficiation systems, trap carbon in the soil. Natural farming practices, combined with algalculture and anaerobic digestion of wastes, creates a below zero or carbon negative footprint.

This is Eco-Logical-Agriculture.


Small scale emerging farmers are best positioned to improve localised food and energy security. They are a key requirement in reducing poverty & environmental impact simultaneously. This can be achieved by the resource efficiency of zero-waste farming systems.


''IT WILL LIKELY TAKE EARTH MILLIONS OF YEARS TO RECOVER FROM THE BIODIVERSITY CRISIS BROUGHT ON BY AGRICULTURAL & INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT.  1 MILLION SPECIES ARE ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION, WHICH AMOUNTS TO A BIODIVERSITY CRISIS SPANNING THE GLOBE AND THREATENING EVERY ECO-SYSTEM."
- UN SCIENTISTS WARN - May 2019

Agroecology provides a holistic approach to the environment and resources, leveraging the potential inherent in all ecosystems to create regenerative agriculture and renewable energy solutions